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The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth.
Albert Camus
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People hasten to judge in order not to be judged themselves.
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Albert Camus (French pronunciation: [albɛʁ kamy]  (listen); 7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French Algerian author, journalist, and key philosopher of the 20th-century. In 1949, Camus founded the Group for International  Liaisons within the Revolutionary Union Movement, which was opposed to  some tendencies of the Surrealist movement of André Breton.
Camus was awarded the 1957 Nobel Prize for Literature “for his important literary production, which with clear-sighted  earnestness illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our  times”. He was the second-youngest recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature, after Rudyard Kipling, and the first African-born writer to receive the award. He is the shortest-lived of any Nobel literature laureate to date,  having died in an automobile accident just over two years after  receiving the award.
Although often cited as a proponent of existentialism, the philosophy with which Camus was associated during his own lifetime, he rejected this particular label. In an interview in 1945, Camus rejected any ideological associations: “No, I am not an existentialist. Sartre and I are always surprised to see our names linked…”
Specifically, his views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay “The Rebel” that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom.
Albert Camus on In Our Time at the BBC. (listen now)
Many books of Albert Camus available, in French, in Les Classiques des sciences sociales.
Albert Camus’ Week: Excerpts, articles, interviews and videos on the website of the Prague Writers’ Festival
“Accidental Friends” the story of the Camus-Sartre friendship and very public breakup
Interview with daughter Catherine – 3AM
Another interview with daughter Catherine – Spike
The Logic of Existential Meaning
Université McGill: le roman selon les romanciers (French) Inventory and analysis of Albert Camus’ non-novelistic writings
Lesjustes.co.uk : English synopsis of “Les Justes” for students
Camus ‘Bookweb’ on literary website The Ledge, with suggestions for further reading.
Camus Interview with Prof. Jean-Marie Apostolides, from the radio program Entitled Opinions
Works by Albert Camus on Open Library at the Internet Archive
(French) Pierre Michel, Albert Camus et Octave MirbeauPDF (640 KB)

Albert Camus (French pronunciation: [albɛʁ kamy]  (listen); 7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French Algerian author, journalist, and key philosopher of the 20th-century. In 1949, Camus founded the Group for International Liaisons within the Revolutionary Union Movement, which was opposed to some tendencies of the Surrealist movement of André Breton.

Camus was awarded the 1957 Nobel Prize for Literature “for his important literary production, which with clear-sighted earnestness illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our times”. He was the second-youngest recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature, after Rudyard Kipling, and the first African-born writer to receive the award. He is the shortest-lived of any Nobel literature laureate to date, having died in an automobile accident just over two years after receiving the award.

Although often cited as a proponent of existentialism, the philosophy with which Camus was associated during his own lifetime, he rejected this particular label. In an interview in 1945, Camus rejected any ideological associations: “No, I am not an existentialist. Sartre and I are always surprised to see our names linked…”

Specifically, his views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay “The Rebel” that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom.

Albert Camus on In Our Time at the BBC. (listen now)

Many books of Albert Camus available, in French, in Les Classiques des sciences sociales.

Albert Camus’ Week: Excerpts, articles, interviews and videos on the website of the Prague Writers’ Festival

“Accidental Friends” the story of the Camus-Sartre friendship and very public breakup

Interview with daughter Catherine – 3AM

Another interview with daughter Catherine – Spike

The Logic of Existential Meaning

Université McGill: le roman selon les romanciers (French) Inventory and analysis of Albert Camus’ non-novelistic writings

Lesjustes.co.uk : English synopsis of “Les Justes” for students

Camus ‘Bookweb’ on literary website The Ledge, with suggestions for further reading.

Camus Interview with Prof. Jean-Marie Apostolides, from the radio program Entitled Opinions

Works by Albert Camus on Open Library at the Internet Archive

(French) Pierre Michel, Albert Camus et Octave MirbeauPDF (640 KB)

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Capital punishment is the most premeditated of murders, to which no criminal’s deed, however calculated, can be compared. For there to be an equivalency, the death penalty would have to punish a criminal who had warned his victim of the date on which he would inflict a horrible death on him and who, from that moment onward, had confined him at his mercy for months. Such a monster is not to be encountered in private life.

Albert Camus, “Reflections on the Guillotine”

Troy Davis Execution Stay Denied—ABC NEWS

(Fuente: nerbles)

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Nov. 7, 1913 is the date of birth of French writer and Nobel  Laureate, Albert Camus. Born in Algeria, Camus originally studied at  (and played soccer for) the University of Algiers. However tuberculosis  set back the completion of his degree (and killed his goalkeeping  career), but eventually he completed his philosophy studies and  relocated to Paris.

In 1957 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature “for his  important literary production, which with clear-sighted earnestness  illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our times…”

Camus was killed in a strange automobile accident in January 1960, along with his publisher, Gallimard, who drove the car…

“I leave Sisyphus at the foot of the mountain. One always finds one’s  burden again. But Sisyphus teaches the higher fidelity that negates the  gods and raises rocks. He too concludes that all is well. This universe  henceforth without a master seems to him neither sterile nor futile.  Each atom of that stone, each mineral flake of that night-filled  mountain, in itself, forms a world. The struggle itself toward the  heights is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus  happy.”     ―       Albert Camus,             The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays

Nov. 7, 1913 is the date of birth of French writer and Nobel Laureate, Albert Camus. Born in Algeria, Camus originally studied at (and played soccer for) the University of Algiers. However tuberculosis set back the completion of his degree (and killed his goalkeeping career), but eventually he completed his philosophy studies and relocated to Paris.

In 1957 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature “for his important literary production, which with clear-sighted earnestness illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our times…”

Camus was killed in a strange automobile accident in January 1960, along with his publisher, Gallimard, who drove the car…

“I leave Sisyphus at the foot of the mountain. One always finds one’s burden again. But Sisyphus teaches the higher fidelity that negates the gods and raises rocks. He too concludes that all is well. This universe henceforth without a master seems to him neither sterile nor futile. Each atom of that stone, each mineral flake of that night-filled mountain, in itself, forms a world. The struggle itself toward the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.” ― Albert Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays

(Fuente: i12bent)

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“Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.”

                                                      Albert Camus

“Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.”

                                                      Albert Camus

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Albert Camus (1913-1960) was a French-Algerian philosopher starting the movement known as absurdism. With his highly successful works like The Stranger, The Rebel, and The Fall, Camus was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, only three years before his death, making him the shortest lived Nobel winner. Not only was he an incredibly influential and intelligent man, he wasn’t too bad on the eyes either.

Albert Camus (1913-1960) was a French-Algerian philosopher starting the movement known as absurdism. With his highly successful works like The Stranger, The Rebel, and The Fall, Camus was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, only three years before his death, making him the shortest lived Nobel winner. Not only was he an incredibly influential and intelligent man, he wasn’t too bad on the eyes either.

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A guilty conscience needs to confess. A work of art is a confession.
Albert Camus 

(Fuente: levilain)

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De pie: Jacques Lacan, Cecile Eluard, Pierre Reverdy, Louis Leiris, Pablo Picasso, Fanie de Campan, Valentine Hugo, Simone de Beauvoir, BrassaiAbajo: Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Michel Leiris, Jean Abier

De pie: Jacques Lacan, Cecile Eluard, Pierre Reverdy, Louis Leiris, Pablo Picasso, Fanie de Campan, Valentine Hugo, Simone de Beauvoir, Brassai
Abajo: Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Michel Leiris, Jean Abier

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Sólo deseaba decirle que lo quiero a usted con todos sus defectos. Quiero o venero a pocas personas. Por todo lo demás, me avergüenzo de mi indiferencia. Pero en cuanto a las personas a las que quiero, nada, ni yo mismo, ni siquiera ellas, harán que deje jamás de quererlas.
Albert Camus
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